Tips In Moving To Washington D.C. From Connecticut

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Many Different Approaches

Washington Monument

During any move, it’s integral to live frugally for a time until you’re able to “find your stride,” as it were, in your new location. You’re going to have unexpected expenses crop up. Even if you’re fairly “well-to-do,” problems could still arise. For example: Say you’re a rock star hiring a moving company, and the moving van gets in a wreck.

Even if you’ve got insurance, you may have to spend money on things lost in the crash until the settlement arrives. So you want to be careful to conserve resources until the whole thing is done even if you have them. This is especially true if you’re pursuing a move from D.C. to Connecticut.

The east coast is one of America’s oldest populated areas. Certainly Saint Augustine in Florida, Santa Barbara in California, and many other locations in the continental U.S. are older owing to Spanish occupation prior to British colonization. But generally, beyond these data points, the deepest legacy of the population in this country stretches from Maine to Georgia.

Accordingly, the highways are congested, they’re not always in the best repair, and moving from point A to point B is going to take time. We’re talking about 336 miles from the city center to city center. That’s according to Google Maps, a five hour and forty-minute drive.

Strategic Timing

If you approach such a drive during the workday, you’ll get stuck in traffic. From about seven in the morning to about seven at night, there are going to be higher levels of traffic. What may make more sense is leaving in the wee hours; midnight or after. Since you’re looking at a five hour and forty-minute trip, invest in ways of diminishing how many “laps” are needed.

If you get a moving truck, you shouldn’t have to make more than two or three trips. If you’re especially savvy, you can get the whole thing done in one jaunt. Either hire movers or mover’s insurance if you can afford it. If you can’t, be especially careful when you’re driving. Co-opting friends makes a lot of sense, too.

Also, be sure you’re moving into the right sort of place. For example, if you were living in The Gantry luxury DC apartments, a comparable set of living spaces in Connecticut might be these Norwalk CT apartments.

Then again, you could be looking for a change of pace. So before you start the process of moving, be sure you take time to scope out your new neighborhood and find the best possible unit there. What makes it the best for you may not be associated with price. It could be location; it could be the floor plan, your neighbors, or the building itself.

Downsizing When Appropriate

Washington Lighthouse

Something else you may want to do is downsize during the move. The cost of moving will be high. Essentially, at over 300 miles, you’re looking at about a tank of gas each way. That’s going to be $100 to $300 total, depending on the size of the tank in the vehicle you’re driving and associated mileage. You’re likely also going to have to pay the first and last month’s rent plus deposit on the new place, too.

If you’re lucky, you’ll get your deposit back on the old place you lived in while you were conducting yourself in D.C. However, another way to make up the difference might involve selling or divesting yourself of unnecessary furniture pieces, clothes, sheets, lamps, TVs, toys, electronics, or what-have-you. There’s always room to downsize. If getting rid of things saves you a trip, then you’ll cut out between $100 and $300 in terms of gas alone.

Reducing Complications Associated With Travel

Making a move between Washington D.C. and Connecticut is going to take some time, it’s going to be complicated, and it’s going to be costly. Conserve your resources, plan, drive at night, downsize if you can, and be sure you choose the right unit before making any moves whatever. Follow tips like these, and the transition will go smoother.

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